PHW Face Book page ran a post about a press release from Virginia Tech's Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center. Please be sure to go to their page to read the thread

 

http://www.facebook.com/PeruvianHorseWorld?v=wall&story_fbid=12...

 

An 18-year-old Thoroughbred gelding came to them barely able to walk. The horse's problem stemmed from a breakdown of both of his hind limb suspensory ligaments. The below link is the press release. Please note that the press release does not contain many details.

 

Three-Pronged Strategy Helps Horse Recover From Debilitating Lameness

 
Intrigued, and wanting more info, Laura provided me a link to contact Dr. Barret (the treating vet) for more information. She informed me that there is a medical publication forthcoming and was kind enough to send me photos of the sling shoes that were described in the press realease.
 
When you look at these photos remember, the shoe is NOT the cure (the platelet rich plasma injections promotes the healing). They present problems of their own, PRESSURE SORES, ugh! It's a race in time to get healing done before complications from the sling start.
 
Still if your like me and you've ever had to do dramatic shoeing to help heal your horse (patten shoes) this would be something to consider.
 
Best,
 
Carol
Hayden House Peruvians
4885 Mette Rd.
Moscow Mills, MO 63362
haydenhouse@juno.com - 636-366-9484 ext 1

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Carol, this is very interesting stuff. I am most interested the PRP treatment that healed the suspensories...this is important information to be considered in the treatment of Degenerative Suspensory Ligament Desmitis that afflicts a number of horse breeds, including the Peruvian Paso horse. I am curious to know if any of this information has reached the hands of Dr. Eleanor Kellon who is working on treatments for DSLD horses. A recovery of suspensories in such a degenerative condition through the use of the injection therapy and the sling shoe is definitly something to be taken seriously.

Thanks for posting this very interesting and helpful information.

Regards, Pam J
Hi Pam,

Thank-you for your reply ;-) Apparently Dr. Barret is familiar with DSLD.

My reason for stating this is when I wrote her I did not discuss my DSLD cases in my e-mail, just my injury case. Yet, iIn Dr. Barret's reply, she mentioned she did not know if the treatment approach she used would help a horse with DSLD.

So, I'm thinking my farm name of Hayden House Peruvians triggered her comment.

I have just posted an invitation to anyone on the DSLD chat line to come join this discussion. Dr. Kellon being a member of that group will become aware.

Best,

Carol
Hayden House Peruvians
4885 Mette Rd.
Moscow Mills, MO 63362
haydenhouse@juno.com - 636-366-9484 ext 1
This TB was never ultrasounded - or I just don't see it in the release. DSLD must first be diagnosed via ultrasound. So as I read it, this would not be any type of "treatment" for DSLD/ESPA - and if this TB wasn't ultrasounded and does not have DSLD/Espa, then I hope the "treatment" works permanently.
Hi Linda,

Your statement that the horse was never ultra sounded is premature ;-)

Personally, I can't imagine the doctor not using them, it's the main tool any vet uses to diagnos the specific point of injury and monitor healing in ligaments.

In a university setting where all the tools are available... Perhaps, the tool's use is so common, it's just not relevant for a press release ;-)

Best

Carol
what I found interesting about that "article" was that there was no mention of ultrasounds done. I don't understand this. "if" this horse was ultrasounded and it indicated DSLD, then that is a whole different story. It isn't just the legs that are affected in DSLD/ESPA. I would not take what was written in that brief "article" as an indication that DSLD/ESPA confirmed by ultrasound can be "cured" with their treatment, as the disease is wywtemic and does affect all breeds, including the Peruvian.
Hi Linda,

Thank-you for your comment.

Please remember, this was not an article, it was a "press release". By their nature, press releases are as breiif as possible, incomplete in details, and only focus on the main topic the release is to call attention to, which in this case is PRP (platelet rich plasma). Really, not much was said at all about three months of dramatic care for an injury.

Since there was no mention about any of the diagnostic tools used or the original complaint/reason the horse was injured and brought to the university, I think it's best to wait until Dr. Barret releases her medical publication on this case before any of us do much conjecture on the usefullness this may have for DSLD cases ;-)

While Dr. Barret wanted to call attention to PRP, I personally was most intrigued by the helper tool she used which was the sling shoes. I would have used these several years ago in treating an injury I had, if I had known about them.

I'm hoping this discussion will get folks attention to that ;-) I think it could be a help to others.

Best,
Carol
Hayden House Peruvians
4885 Mette Rd.
Moscow Mills, MO 63362
haydenhouse@juno.com - 636-366-9484 ext 1
Systemic Proteoglycan Deposition Is Not a Characteristic of Equine Degenerative Suspensory Ligament Desmitis (DSLD)

Daniel Schenkman, DVM, PhDa, Anibal Armien, DVM, PhDb, Roy Pool Jr., DVM, PhDc, James M. Williams, PhDd, Ronald D. Schultz, PhDa, Jorge O. Galante, MDd
Abstract
Recently Degenerative Suspensory Ligament Desmitis (DSLD) has been proposed to be a disease characterized by systemic deposition of proteoglycan (PG) in connective tissues. To investigate this hypothesis, 6 clinically affected Peruvian Paso horses were compared to 2 unaffected quarterhorses and one unaffected standardbred. Histological sections of limb ligaments and tendons, nuchal ligaments, aortas, hearts, eyes, visceral organs and brains from both groups were stained with H&E as well as special stains for PG. Safranin-O stained sections were found to be optimal for elucidating the presence of PG. Although lesions characteristic of DSLD were present in suspensory ligaments of each clinically affected horse, including foci of chondroid metaplasia with abundant PG, a similar but less pronounced pattern of PG deposition was present in control horses. In contrast to findings of the previous study, PG deposition was not unique to DSLD horses, and PG deposition in aortas and nuchal ligaments of some control horses exceeded levels of PG present in similar tissue of DSLD horses. Furthermore, the “vascular lesion” described in the media of arteries as cellular separation and intercellular amorphous matrix deposition was within the spectrum of changes recognized in both affected and unaffected horses. We found no evidence that DSLD is a systemic PG deposition disease.

This was submitted to the Journal of Equine Veterinary Science Oct. 2009
Hi Rich,

Thank-You for your reply. It is informative to the aspects of DSLD.

However... ;-) This particular discussion is not about DSLD. This discussion is about the shoes used as a healing aid to the actual PRP treatment that healed this horse's injury.

Dr. Barret mentioned to me in the correspondance she and I had, that she didn't think this particular approach would be helpful in DSLD cases.

Hopefully, my answer will satisfy the DSLD questions/information and we can get to what I want to discuss - What do you think of the shoes? Does anyone think it could have helped them in treating injuries in the past or perhaps the future???

Respectfully,

Carol
Hayden House Peruvians
4885 Mette Rd.
Moscow Mills, MO 63362
haydenhouse@juno.com - 636-366-9484 ext 1
Actually, Carol there were several posts that mentioned dsld/espa prior to my post, in fact you referenced it at least four times and made this statement: “I have just posted an invitation to anyone on the dsld chat line to come join this discussion.”

Since equine systemic proteoglycan accumulation (espa) had been brought into this discussion by someone else, I felt that you and the people at PHW would be interested in the latest research” Apparently that is not the case.
Hi Rich ;-)

Thank-you for your response.

Please understand, when I invited folks from the DSLD chat line to engage in this conversation... It was clearly an invitation to discuss the sling shoes. Perhaps you misunderstood the invitation and did not catch the subject of this discussion ;-)

If any tpe of injury/disease problems are discussed as to how the sling shoe might help, that is a part of a shoeing discussion, which is the subject of this forum.

Also, please understand, I am most certainly interested in all new things learned/discovered as it relates to DSLD. In fact, I'm so interested, I donated a mare to the reaseachers who did the study you referenced. So I am quite aquainted, as I was contacted early on when the medical publication was completed. Perhaps I got the news before you ;-)

Do you have a thought to the sling shoes? I would be interested in your views.

Regards,


Carol
Hayden House Peruvians
4885 Mette Rd.
Moscow Mills, MO 63362
haydenhouse@juno.com - 636-366-9484 ext 1

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